Home » A Guide to Nineteenth Century American Literature for Young Readers by Henrietta C. Wright
A Guide to Nineteenth Century American Literature for Young Readers Henrietta C. Wright

A Guide to Nineteenth Century American Literature for Young Readers

Henrietta C. Wright

Published March 5th 2011
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Kindle Edition
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 About the Book 

Originally published in 1895 and 1899 as chapters of the author’s larger two-part “Children’s Stories in American Literature,” and equivalent in length to a physical book of approximately 100 pages, this Kindle edition, in simple language aimed atMoreOriginally published in 1895 and 1899 as chapters of the author’s larger two-part “Children’s Stories in American Literature,” and equivalent in length to a physical book of approximately 100 pages, this Kindle edition, in simple language aimed at young readers, describes the lives and work of ten great nineteenth-century American writers: Washington Irving, James Fenimore Cooper, Nathaniel Hawthorne, Edgar Allan Poe, Ralph Waldo Emerson, Henry Wadsworth Longfellow, Harriet Beecher Stowe, Oliver Wendell Holmes, Louisa May Alcott, and Mark Twain.Sample passages:While engaged in editorial work in New York, [Edgar Allan] Poe wrote his first great poem, The Raven, which was first published under an assumed name. It was not until he recited the poem by request at a gathering of the literary workers of New York that his authorship was suspected. Immediately afterward the poem was published under his name. It was regarded by critics in England and America as illustrating the highest poetic genius. From this time Poe, who had hitherto been ranked among the best prose writers of his native land, now took precedence among the poets.All the world has read in “Little Women” the chronicle of that happy childhood passed in the shadow of the Concord elms- and the experiences of the sisters Beth, Meg, Amy, and Jo, have won a place in American literature which the child-heart will never willingly let go. Undoubtedly the liveliest and brightest of the merry group of girls was Louisa [May Alcott] herself, whose wit made stock out of household calamities, and whose ambition made defeat but an incentive to fresh endeavor.About the Author:American author Henrietta Christian Wright (1854-1899) specialized in writing on literature, history, and science for children. Other works include “Children’s Stories of the Great Scientists” and “Children’s Stories in American History.”